Trailer Play – Session #2

Join us out in the field for the next installment of trailer play (not training!) where we have no agenda and we simply let the horses be in charge of everything! In fact, my real agenda is to help the horses heal from all their previous trailer trauma, by letting them do everything at their own pace and creating a really positive, play-space atmosphere around the trailer.

If you missed the 1st Session, click here. As before, this video is in real-time so you can see the rhythm and pace of things:

Jini Patel Thompson is a natural health writer and Freedomite. She began riding at age 2 in Kenya, and got her first horse at age 8 in Alberta, and so continues a life-long journey and love affair with these amazing creatures.
Trailer Play – Session #2

3 thoughts on “Trailer Play – Session #2

  • October 31, 2017 at 12:41 pm
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    Are you sure you don’t need the trailer to be attached to a truck or what ever so it doesn’t tip?

    Reply
    • November 1, 2017 at 7:58 pm
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      Excellent question Susan and I will be sure to show this in my next video: The front of the trailer is stabilized by the electric lift that is extended down onto a concrete block. But you’re right, not all gooseneck trailers have this so I will be sure to point it out! Thanks!!

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    • November 3, 2017 at 5:37 pm
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      Susan I also double-checked with Maggi and did a bit of research. Maggi said my trailer is safe to use when unhitched. It is new and the hydraulic drop-leg jack is not going to collapse at the front. She said you also have to consider the weight ratio of the horse to the trailer. Mine is not going to tip or move even with heavy Belgians. But loading onto a light-weight bumper pull would not be a good idea – unless you were loading Minis.

      This other experienced trailer owner on a forum echoed that advice:

      “I agree with this…it really depends on the trailer. My LQ gooseneck is 28 ft long with a heavy hydraulic jack in the front. I have no fear of living in it when it’s not hooked up….we do it when camping all the time…and I have loaded horses into it unhooked. It is a tank though at 10,000 lbs empty. There is a lot of length to it and one horse going in and out the back is not putting much weight on the jack to speak of. My old lighter Trailer that was half that size…no I’d not load a horse without dropping the trailer onto the truck for stability.”

      These UK forum responses seem to confirm that advice – in the UK most trailers are smaller bumper-pulls. But some people have stabilized their unhitched bumper-pull by stacking concrete blocks at all 4 corners of the trailer, and you would also want to brace (chock) the tires front and back.

      http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/forums/archive/index.php/t-531770.html

      You’ve made me think though, and I think that as the ground softens in winter, I’m going to add some additional stabilization at the corners – just in case 🙂

      Again, thank you for the great question!

      Reply

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